Body Love 101

Dig yourselfHey chickens,

Apologies for the lack of postage of late. Work has been insane, so I’ve been coming home most nights with a brain like runny mashed potato (ew), and pretty much just flopping on the couch and staring blindly at Youtube. I’ve had no shortage of ideas for posts, just no energy. Thanks for your patience. And, howdy to all the new readers I’ve gathered over the last couple of weeks. ūüôā

This blog is a very belated follow up to this post¬†on breaking the habit of negative body talk. In my previous post, I pledged to say no to body bashing.¬†Other people pledge to cut out full-fat milk and cheese toasties, but me, I’m on a self-abuse diet – no I’m uglys, no I look awfuls, no my thighs/stomach/butt looks gross in thats, no ew I’ve got eye-bagses, no I look like shit from this angles, no I’m a fat disgusting pigs. If anyone else is trying the same approach, I’d love to know how it’s going. For this post, I’m taking it one step further – replacing the hateful words with loving words, and caring for oneself when hit with an attack of the body blues.

Last time, I talked about treating your body as a best friend – and best friends don’t generally call each ugly and fat and repulsive. Best friends *do*, however (or, at least, they should…), call each other fabulous and brilliant and lovable and awesome, and give each other big hugs and tonnes of chocolate when they’re going through shit. Why should it not be the same with our bodies? Fluttershy from My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic¬†put it the best: “Sometimes, we all need to be shown a little kindness.” Especially, if you ask me, by ourselves.

The following are eight tips for battling the body blues, steering clear of the Self Loathing Pit of Despair, and showing your body the kindness it deserves. For it is awesome.

1) First of all, when the body blues hit,¬†it’s okay to feel like crap. Of course, it’s great to have strategies to use and weapons to wield when the Self Loathing Pit of Despair threatens to swallow you up, but it really is okay just to stop, rest and allow yourself to feel how ever you feel. Sometimes, fighting against negative emotions and willing them away only makes you feel shittier. So, just stop. Dive under the blankets and have a good bawl. Cuddle up on the couch with a blanket and heaps of cushions, and watch bad TV. Fill up the basin, dunk your head in and scream underwater. Spend hours staring into space popping bubble wrap. Whatever works.

2)¬†Practice kindness. ¬†When our friends and loved ones are down, we do nice things for them. So…when the body blues rear their ugly heads, show yourself the same benevolence and do something nice for you.¬†Paint your nails, faff about with your curling iron, put on your favourite skirt and twirl around, snuggle up with your beloved/the kids/the cat, go to the park and sit under your favourite tree, take yourself out, order a big filthy cappuccino and scribble away in your journal and pretend you’re a famous writer in a cafe in Paris…whatever takes your fancy.

3) If there’s anything going on around you that’s triggering the body blues, walk the fuck away. Sometimes this will not always be possible but,¬†if there’s material around you that’s making you feel less than brilliant about your body, just squash it. Got magazines full of unrealistic beauty bullshit? Haul ’em on down to your local Sallie Army store, or to the nearest kindy for kids to cut up. Biggest Loser or any other weightloss propaganda on TV? Change the channel. Article full of fat hatred online? Close the tab and look at cute kitties/puppies/pandas on Youtube instead (which I need to do more often). If it ain’t in the house, it can’t make you feel shit about yourself.

4) Surround yourself with positive people. This one’s a bit of a no-brainer, really. As the pastor from old church put it, “If you want to soar with eagles, why are you hanging around with turkeys?” So true. Hang out with those people whose support you can count on, and who you know will give you a much needed boost when the Self Loathing Pit of Despair caves in. Don’t hang out with those people who make disparaging comments, however “helpful” they think they’re being.

5) Make lists. I’ve been practising the art of saying loving things about my body out loud…but I’m also finding practising self-affirmation in written form really helps. That way, you’ve got a list of lovely things to crank out when the body blues come around.

I wrote a list about what I like about my body just the other day. I wrote all the basic stuff, like my blue eyes, and the way my hair goes ringlet-y after it’s been washed, and my ski-jump nose ¬†and the fact I do have big boobs and big hips and a butt that sticks out (hey, who needs a bustle? ;)) and a small waist. I wrote some random things as well, like how I scrunch up my nose when I smile, my loud laugh, and my skinny ankles – which I think are cute. And, some slightly sexy stuff, like how full my lips feel when Pumpkin kisses me, and how soft and sensuous and sumptuous I feel when we’re naked together – and that’s without him needing to tell me. ūüėČ To be able to see my body in that way feels like a huge victory, and it feels damn good to see it written down.

If you’re struggling to come up with things you like about your body, write a list of what you think are your best qualities. Write down a whole bunch of positive adjectives – Strong, Talented, Kind, Caring, Loyal, Encouraging, Lovable. Rewrite them with flouro-coloured felt pens on a huge-ass piece of paper, and stick them somewhere prominent, or else write them out on a smaller bit of card, and stick it in your wallet for you to stumble over when you pay for your morning coffee. Like a Business Card of Awesomeness.

6) Pick a theme tune. Sounds naff, but I’m serious. When I’m feeling down, I have my little selection of pick-me-up-songs, but there’s a select few I crank out when then body blues arrive. My ultimate Body Blues Be Gone song would have to be Skyscraper, by Demi Lovato.¬†¬†Yeah, yeah. I’m a music snob from way back. But, this is the song I blast at full version when the self-hate sets in, when I think back on the people that made fun of my weight, and when all that fat hate online reaches through and throttles me through the screen. Because, people can try to tear me (us) down, but I’m a tall, strong, steely building, so I’d like to see you try. So, if it helps, pick a song – something with empowering, no bull-shit and preferably body-positive lyrics.

7) Visualise victory. This is one of my new favourites. Reader Grace made a comment on my last post about beating the body blues, and one of the strategies she put in place was drawing herself as a kick-ass superhero punching out all her body gremlins, and standing tall over the cowering, snivelling monsters once they’d been defeated. I did the same when I was feeling like donkey poop last weekend: I drew myself, in my wedding dress, with long flowing hair and a crown on my head, brandishing a sword at a troll (a super ugly one, with horns and sharp teeth!), doing my best “You shall not pass” expression. I cannot draw for shit, and the picture looked fucking ridiculous. But envisioning myself as a powerful figure fighting off the haters made me feel…well, awesome, actually. So give it a try.

8) And finally, go to your power place. Think back to those times where you felt amazing in yourself. Like having a playlist of “go-to” songs on your iPod, build up a “playlist” of awesome body love memories you can tap into and draw strength from. Think of those moments where you caught a glimpse of yourself in the mirror, and thought “I’d do me”. Think back on the times you first tried on *that* outfit that made your confidence soar right off the charts, or when you just got your hair done and you couldn’t stop checking yourself out in every shop window on the way home.

My ultimate body confidence power place comes from my wedding day. I really struggled with my self-image leading up to our wedding but, on the day, I felt like a rockstar. I had my emerald green dress, and my knitted flowers, and my feathery fascinator, and my hair and makeup all done, and my French manicure and my toenails painted to match my dress – and I felt genuinely drop-dead gorgeous. Here I am:

E&M 411

So, build a memory bank of the times where you felt completely and utterly comfortable in your own skin and 100% smokin’ hot, no matter what your body was doing at the time. And, as those moments crop up again, take note of them. Keep a journal – record the moment, date it, praise yourself for yet another victory and go back to the journal when you need a lift.

So, those are my tips: it’s okay to feel like crap (and have a REST), practice kindness, step away from any triggering or negative material, surround yourself with positive people, make affirming and loving lists, pick a theme tune, visualise victory and go to your power place. Bear in mind, this is what’s working the best for me at the moment. You may have a completely different set of tips, and that’s totally fine (and, if you do, I’d love to hear some of them).

Some of them may sound a little naff, so you can take or leave them. Some of them may seem difficult or even strange at first – and, trust me, some of them still feel foreign and bizarre to me. But, however you choose to practice body love, I recommend it – because it’s one hell of a l0t better than the opposite.

Big fat hugs,

Honey Bunny.

Advertisements

Breaking the habit

fabulousA mate of mine recently set up and added me to a Facebook group she made, to help keep herself accountable as she embarked on a new journey in her life. Her plan is to break (in her words) her unhealthy eating and drinking habits in 30 days – in front of her family and friends, via the Facebook group.

I sent her a supportive message, and pointed out that I have started, through Health At Every Size, practising healthy habits, which are helping me feel amazing and much better in my body, even though I’m not losing tonnes of weight (well, I don’t know. I don’t own a scale). I said I hoped that her making healthy choices makes her feel awesome, and that she can PM me if she wants to chat. Which I hope was an appropriate response. I also discouraged her from weighing herself. But, that’s up to her.

My friend asked people to post on the the group’s wall if there were any habits they themselves wanted to break within 30 days. Several people posted – saying they wanted to give up smoking, kick their midnight snacking habit, drink less coffee, go to the gym every day etc. And, for solidarity, I added mine – to break my habit of negative self-talk. Negative body talk in particular.

Because? The things I still catch myself saying about my body are far more poisonous than any processed food or refined sugar I’ve ever put inside it.

This post is quite timely, as Ragen Chastain did an awesome blog¬†just the other day about body talk amongst women. The website BlogHer.com¬†did a survey on “fat talk”, which found that almost 75% of the women surveyed (not sure if this is US women, all worldwide…but still). across all age groups, engage in negative body talk with other women. All the usual stuff like, “my butt looks huge in these pants,” and “ugh, my thighs are massive,” and “oh my god, I look about three months pregnant” (yup. I’ve used that one). In even more disturbing news, negative body conversations are starting in girls as young as 11 years old.¬†Which I can believe. BlogHer asked the women who contributed why they engaged in such damaging conversations, and their answers ranged from “We are afraid of sounding like we are bragging about our bodies,”¬† to “it’s bonding over a common interest” to “it’s the social norm – just part of life.”

Yup, so true. Remember this clip from Mean Girls?¬†Where Rachel McAdams and the other mean girls stand in front of the mirror and verbally bash their bodies (I have man shoulders! My pores are huge! My nail beds suck!), and Lindsay Lohan’s character’s chimes in with “I get really bad breath in the morning”? I laughed – somewhat ruefully. Because that scene could have been lifted straight from my own teenagerhood. And preteens before that. And adulthood after that.

I vividly remember being about 12 or 13 and going to the pool with a couple of girlfriends. We got into our swimsuits, stood in front of the changing room mirror – where we preceded to boldly point out all our flaws and imperfections, just like Rachel McAdams and co. According to us, we were fat, our thighs were massive, our stomachs stuck out too much and our butts were saggy. At the time, it didn’t seem to do us much damage – after a while, we shrugged it off and made a beeline for the water, where we clambered around on those giant inflatable dragon thingies for a couple of hours. But looking back on it, it disturbes the shit out of me – we were so young, so innocent and we already pouring scorn and disdain all over our bodies. We’d only just convinced our parents to let us go to the pool by ourselves for an afternoon, and we were already bonding, already forming this warped¬†camaraderie¬†over what was supposedly so wrong¬†with our young figures. It’s…scary, really.

So, that was where it started. And it continued through my college years. And followed me to University. And stalked me well into my 20s. Time after time, my gal pals and I got together and we put our bodies through the ringer. We did it at sleepovers. We did it on coffee dates, and out for dinner. We did it while out for walks. At girlie movie nights, and while out drinking. Even at the “crafternoons” I organised – when we should have been squealing over our combined yarn stashes and swapping brownie recipes. And we were mean. Meaner than Simon Cowell and Donald Trump and that bitchy “PR maven” on America’s Next Top Model combined. Our boobs were too small, or disproportionately huge (mine). Our butts were flat and mannish. Our thighs were gross and dimply (mine). Our shoulders were too slopey (mine). Our arms were too long. Our feet were ugly (mine). We had back fat (me). We looked pregnant (me). Our skin was blotchy. Our hair was oily (me) and we had gaps in our teeth we could drive a truck through (me). Yup, we were bitches.

These days? Actually, I’ve noticed the bitchy body conversations dwindling a bit between my mates and I. I dunno – could be that we’re getting older. I have some really close girl friends I can talk to if I’m feeling truly shite about my self image, but, with most people, I try not to incite body bashing conversations, especially not in a group situation. However, when it’s just me and my husband, that’s when the slurs start coming thick and fast. “I’m disgusting,” I’ll tell him over breakfast. “Look how massive my stomach’s gotten,” I’ll pipe up, grabbing fistfuls of my midriff so he can’t possibly miss it. “Ugh, I’m a fat pig,” I’ll yelp over dinner, having cleaned my plate, which is a Bad Thing at my size.¬†“Ugh, look at my double chin,” I’ll implore him while we’re having a romantic moment in the bathroom, brushing our teeth. ¬†“I look like shit, eh, babe?” I’ll chirp, over and over again, as I’m about to climb into my bed, in my adorable pyjamas, into his waiting arms.

Yes, I have ruined many a schmoopy and cutesy couple moment with all my ¬†body hating bullshit. He’s my husband – I’m only telling him all this because, in his presence, I feel comfortable enough to divulge how truly filthy I’m feeling at any one moment. But, it’s bad. Cos it hurts him. It breaks his heart to see the woman he adores heap such hatred and vitriol upon herself – and it breaks my heart to see him do the same. He thinks I’m crazy, he thinks I’m cruel, and he wishes I could see what he sees. And in my dark moments, I wish I could too.

So…yeah. While I know I’m getting better in the area of body bashing, there is still room for improvement. So, I decided it would be my 30-day challenge to ditch the shitty self talk. But, I knew it wouldn’t be easy. Because…talking smack about oneself is familiar. Its comfortable. It’s something I’ve done since primary school (saying everything from my art projects to my pigtails looked “dumb”), so it sure as shit is easy. It’s weirdly self-preserving as well: in the culture I was raised and schooled in, bragging about one’s achievements and/or appearance was a cardinal sin. Oh sure, you could be proud of the aforementioned achievements and/or appearance, as long as you didn’t shout it from the rooftops. In fact, being self-depreciating and critical was preferable to being immodest and “up yourself”. So, even now, to say that I’m pretty/smart/talented/cute/sexy feels odd and uncomfortable. Down-playing my achievements and being cruel and bullying to myself, however, comes perfectly naturally.

And actually? Like a lot of habit-forming behaviours, body bashing can become oddly addictive. Margaret Cho¬†said it the the best:“It is a good life, if I watch myself. Kind of like when I used to diet, but now instead of limiting calories, I will not allow negative self talk. I cut out insults like I cut out carbs and it is hard as hell because I crave self abuse like hot, fresh sourdough bread, but you know you have to be nice to you if you are going to live together.”¬†Very, very true. And it’s weird, because I crave compliments from others in the same way I crave New York Pizza and Whittakers Peanut Butter Chocolate. Yet, when the compliments do come, I don’t believe them. And so, the cycle begins again.

But, Margaret is absolutely right. You and your bod are pretty much stuck together for life – so you may as well be kind to it. Think about it – would you tell your bestie she’s hideous and repulsive and looks like shit? Hell no. And if you did, you’d tell her you were really fucking sorry, and buy her coffee and a new pair of shoes every day for a month. So…what if we saw our bodies as our best friends? They do some pretty amazing shit for us – they breathe, they blink, they pump blood, they hug, high five, smile, laugh, the works. What if they were our mates, our chums, our soul-mates and allies? Not our adversaries. And…best friends don’t talk shit to each other.

So, this is my challenge. Treating my body as a friend. Not a frenemy. And, basically, as Margaret says, cutting out self-abuse. I am not cutting out hot sour dough bread (or any bread, for that matter), but I want to cut the bullshit. No I-look-like-shits, no I-hate-my-stomachs, no My-thighs-are-huges, no I’m a fat, disgusting pigs, no I’m uglys. None of that. Because it hurts. It hurts me, it hurts my husband, it hurts my mates and I’m sick of hurting. I can’t always muster up nice things to say about myself in the place of all the abuse…but not giving in to body bashing is a good place to begin. If I ain’t got nothing nice to say about me, then I’m saying nothing at all. I’ve been a Mean Girl all my life, but I can stop any time I want. And…I’m stopping now.

More later.